KBS Tour C-Taper Lite Golf Club Shaft Review

 KBS TOUR C-TAPER LITE GOLF SHAFTS

By Russ Ryden, A Golf Digest America’s 100 Best Clubfitter
Fit2Score, Dallas Fort Worth, Texas

KBS CTaper Lite Image

The KBS C-Taper Lite is a welcome addition the the KBS line of golf shafts for irons. the C-Taper is one of my favorites when working with a player looking for a lower launch, penetrating ball flight. The profiles are consistent from flex to flex, making it easy to change weight and stiffness while seeking a perfect fit for feel and flight.  The KBS C-Taper Lite profiles fall between the C-Taper S and S+.  One might say they are a C-Taper S on a diet. The C-Taper Lite is a great shaft if you fit best into a mid weight shaft and want the shaft to keep the ball down to the degree that a shaft can..

The technical discussion, measurements and testing results are available only to registered readers

A few weeks before the C-Taper Lite released, I caught up with Kim Braly at the PGA Tour Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial tournament.  This interview was shot next to the driving range. We talked about Kim’s early days at PGA Tour events, iron fitting and the C-Taper Lite.

KBS CTLite Set EI.

The technical discussion, measurements and testing results are available only to registered readers

The weight range of the KBS C-Taper Lite family of shafts is exactly in the sweet spot for the slightly stronger than average golfer. It is available from many of the brands as an option. I have ordered a number sets mixed to create ascending weight sets from the Mizuno custom department. A nice finishing touch to these sets is to use the S or X flex 8 iron shaft in your wedges. It creates a spinner shaft as taught in the past to Royal Precision Rifle Shaft builders.

  • John Knobbe

    Russ, if I am reading Your EI profile right, it appears that the “R” in the Lite is softer than the 110R?
    John

    • DevotedGolfer

      John, the EI profile is the average for the whole range of the product. The actual stiffness, in pounds, is shown in the table. The butt stiffness is taken at 32.75 inches from the tip. The loading tower is 2.25 inches from the tip. The shaft is deflected 1″ and the scale is zeroed. This removes any effect of shaft bow or bend. The shaft is then deflected 4 more inches and that is the number you see in the table. I like pounds more than I like R, S & X or 4.0, 4.5, etc. We all understand pounds. Every shaft we review is measured exactly the same way. This will be interesting, uniform stiffness measurements. Tip to butt ratio is a comparison of tip stiffness to butt stiffness along the same beam described above. This is a good indicator of launch tendency of a shaft design as is EI slope. EI slope can be misleading if the shaft has a rapid loss of stiffness somewhere as a design parameter to create a particular launch tendency.

      • John Knobbe

        Russ, Thanks for the detailed explanation. I’m trying to draw a correlation between this shaft and others currently marketed.
        John

  • Steve

    I currently play C-taper stiff – to build out an ascending weight set would I use the C-taper lite in stiff for 4-6 and swing weight the whole set the same?

    • DevotedGolfer

      I typically MOI match. This can be approximated with a swing weight scale by progressive Swing Weights. D1 in 4i, D1.5 in 5i, D2 in 6i and so on, ending in D4 in PW. Which then is a good match for your wedges which are in the D4 D5 range. Ascending weight shafts in a straight D2 set will lighten the overall weight of your clubs, move the balance a little toward the grip. You may need a good clubmaker to take a little weight out of the head by drilling into the hosel a little inside the head if you cannot get to the lighter weight with the existing head weight. Ascending weight makes MOI matching easier. Ping uses AWT shafts. It is interesting how close a swing weighted set of Pings are to MOI matches.

      • Steve

        Ok I am finally going to get around the this mixed experiment – my current set is Adams CMB with C-taper R+ ss. Should I use the R in the lite and HS or the S and ss?

  • Dave N.

    I am receiving a set of KBS C-taper lites to try as a part of a give away from KBS. Should I plan to soft step these at least once? twice? Right now I am using KBS tour 90 R flex. They are a little flexible for me. They also go a little too high for me. Are the CT-lites going to deliver a flight between the tour 90 and the tour as advertised?

    • You are adding 12 grams and 1.8 pounds of stiffness. That is quite a bit. Soft stepping will change that a little, but you will still be no where near what you are now playing. The added stiffness and the stiffer tip is going to bring your flight down. Let us know how it works. I have not yet seen an entire set, just 6i review samples, so I cannot tell you how much soft stepping will affect stiffness. But given where you are coming from and where the CT Lite measures, if you are at all comfortable with your current irons, soft stepping twice will not be a bad idea.

  • Maxime FRYSOU

    Hello Russ,

    I see that the C-taper lite balance value is around 20″. On other shaft profiles, i see value between 1 and 2. Is it still an inch value ? What is the length chosen as a reference ? Thank you very much.

    • I changed the software to indicate balance as a difference from the center of the shaft, + is closer to the butt, – closer to the tip. The C Taper lights are 1.2, higher balance.

  • gary smith

    I`m playing the Ctaper reg and my shorter irons flight a little to high for my liking although i do like the height in my longer irons.I like the feel and the lightish weight.
    I think the Ctaper stiff will be to much shaft for me.
    would a Ctaper lite stiff give me what I need?

    • Gary,
      Generally a stiffer shaft will bring down launch. Generally is a very broad term. I went from CTaper Lites to R flex Tour FLT’s. to solve the very same problem. I used the R because I like to stay in that weight range on my irons. The alternative is to work with a pro on your shaft lean through impact. You can do some self teaching by learning what it feels like to position your hands through impact to hit a shot high followed by hitting a shot low with the same iron. I can change launch by 3 degrees based on how I lean my shaft through impact. Once you learn that feel you will have much greater control of your irons.

      • gary smith

        Thankyou and it`s so funny you mention that because I started the process yesterday learning the punch shot.
        Thank again for taking the time to reply

        • It is not a punch, It is a full swing shot. Doing this will improve your awareness of the position of your hands through impact. Both shots are the same swing the only difference is leaning he shaft with hand position. When you learn it, you will KNOW what your hands are doing at impact.